Superfortress RB-29 44-61999 ‘Over-Exposed!’ plane crash site on Bleaklow – photos, history, directions and grid references.

RB29 Superfortress air crash site at Higher Shelf Stones on Bleaklow in the Dark Peak.

History (scroll down for directions)

The Superfortress took off on the morning of 3 November 1948, at around 10.15 from Scampton, Lincolnshire for Burtonwood USAF base, near Warrington, England. It was a routine flight with 2 other aircraft, the RB29 carrying USAF wages among other things. The crew were due to return to the States a few days later.

When ‘Over Exposed!’ failed to arrive at Burtonwood, an air search was initiated and that afternoon the burning wreck was spotted high on the moors near Higher Shelf Stones. By chance members of the Harpur Hill RAF Mountain Rescue Unit were just finishing an exercise two and a half miles away, so they quickly made their way to the scene of the crash but there was clearly nothing that could have been done for any of the crew.

All 13 men on board had been killed instantly when the aircraft flew into the moor. It is not known why Captain Tanner did not fly at a height sufficient to clear the high ground.

For more, please see the account of a member of the recovery party which arrived on site the day after (photo above, top left).

‘Over Exposed!’ was a photo reconnaissance aircraft – hence the name – and had photographed some of the nuclear bomb tests at Bikini Atoll in the Pacific Ocean and had taken part in the Berlin airlift.

CREW
pilot Captain Landon P. Tanner
co-pilot, Captain Harry Stroud;
engineer, Technical Sergeant Ralph Fields;
navigator, Sergeant Charles Wilbanks;
radio operator, Staff Sergeant Gene A. Gartner;
radar operator, David D. Moore;
camera crew, Technical Segeant Saul R. Banks, Sergeant Donald R. Abrogast, Sergeant Robert I. Doyle and Private First Class William M. Burrows.
Two other crew members were Corporal M. Franssen and Corporal George Ingram.
Acting as photographic adviser was Captain Howard Keel of the 4201st Motion Picture Unit.

Photoset of RAF Harper Hill Mountain Rescue Team which includes photos taken during the recovery operation.

The crash site on Google Maps
maps.google.co.uk/maps?hl=en&ll=53.45054,-1.864591&am…

View on Bing maps using Ordnance Survey mapping

Grid Reference Finder

Grid references and directions to the crash site from the top of the Snake Pass (car parking)

Approximate post code for the lay-by is S33 0AB

My preference would be to visit the crash site from the trig point at Higher Shelf Stones but the directions provided below are for the quickest routes to the site. It is about 45 – 60 minutes walk to the crash site from the lay-by (car parking) at the summit of Snake Pass.

Warnings and disclaimer
If you are planning on visiting the site, the usual warnings about having the right kit and plenty of Kendal mint cake apply; map and compass and the ability to use them, waterproofs, good boots and so on. Low cloud makes for an atmospheric visit but it also increases the chances of getting lost. On Bleaklow that’s at best an inconvenient and frustrating experience and at worst a call out for Mountain Rescue. At the risk of sounding paternalistic, I’d advise those dressed for the pub and using a GPS app on their phone against it. It is nearly always wet and boggy. One of the biggest risks is in walking along the paved sections when they are iced up. The details below are accurate as of January 2016 but do not constitute professional guidance, so of course you use them at your own risk.

Directions

Walk north along the Pennine Way (PW) from the layby along the made path (the new path and paving further on is to minimise the erosion of the Devil’s Dike).

The PW crosses the old Roman road at Doctor’s Gate and soon the first of the paved sections starts.

At the end of this short paved section there are some steps down to cross a little stream at SK 09210 93611. After this point the made path becomes a good stony path and it is about 10 minutes’ walk to the point where another path leaves the PW for the crash site.

At SK 09848 94244 the paving stones reappear, climbing slightly just ahead of you. Here, i.e. just before the paving stones start again, an intermittent path leaves the PW on the left and goes directly to the crash site. A slab of stone flat on the ground on your left marks the spot where you leave the PW.

It is very wet underfoot. This path follows a dike across Alport Low, the dike being marked on OS 1:50000 maps but not on 1:25000 maps. The dike is not that obvious on the ground but can clearly be seen from the southern end of the crash site for the return journey.

The path crosses Crooked Clough at SK 09443 94495 and continues gaining height before turning north to get to the crash site.

If you want to visit via the trig point at Higher Shelf Stones, you will need to keep heading north west across rough moor (no path) until you come to the edge of the moor and the drop to White Clough, then turn right. It is easy walking up to the trig point.

The path from the PW is fairly clear in good visibility. In low cloud, you might be better off taking the slightly longer route via Hern Clough. In this case, or if you miss the path turning, stick to the intermittently paved sections of the PW, walk past a PW marker stone and you will arrive at a cairn where the path appears to fork. Keep left (there is a marker stone in the cairn pointing the way). It is about half an hour from the lay-by to this point.

The PW drops slightly down to the stream at Hern Clough. Keep the stream on your right following the PW as it turns west (left). In a couple of minutes you will arrive at the point where you leave the PW at SK 09708 94773. Here the PW heads north, passing a marker stone.

Instead, cross the stream (i.e. walk west) and follow another path which immediately turns right (north) and follows another stream, running parallel to the PW for a few minutes in a north westerly direction.

At SK 09468 94926 this path leaves the stream and heads west and out across the moor, going directly to the southern end of the crash site.

The crash site memorial stone at the north western edge of the site is at SK 09040 94896 which is about 200m to the north east of the trig point on Higher Shelf Stones.

Note the debris is not visible from the trig point, the wreckage being hidden from view by the peat groughs and hags. However, if you need to get your bearings when you are at the site, the trig point is visible from the memorial stone.

The return journey is probably a bit easier – head south east and turn right when you reach the Pennine Way. Going too far to the south will put you in Crooked Clough which will of course mean a climb back out again.

From the southern end of the crash site you can pick up the intermittent path which leads back to the Pennine Way. In clear weather you will see the dike crossing the moor; this is the route back to the PW.

Note that on returning to the PW, the first grough the path crosses is not the PW; keep going till you reach the obvious footpath then follow the PW back to the lay-by.

Posted in Superfortress 44-61999 'Over-Exposed!'
7 comments on “Superfortress RB-29 44-61999 ‘Over-Exposed!’ plane crash site on Bleaklow – photos, history, directions and grid references.
  1. Martin Bennett says:

    On 14th November 2014 my son and I visited the crash site of ‘Over Exposed’ on Bleaklow and returned down White Clough and then West along the Doctor’s Gate path. As we approached Doctor’s Gate we were upset to discover that part of the aircraft from the crash site had been abandoned next to a newly erected fence by Shelf Brook, probably after it had been taken from the site by ‘collectors’. It appeared to be part of the nose, or tail, wheel assembly and included the chromed stanchion and steel fittings. It was very heavy and may have been left after the ‘collectors’ became tired of carrying the weight more than a kilometer from the site. It’s a shame that the wreckage can’t be left alone to act as a memorial to those who died in the crash.

    • Ian D B says:

      Hi Martin, thanks for your comment. The people who remove wreckage – whether to sell on e-bay or for their private collection (i.e. their garden shed) or for use in a project that has as much chance of getting off the ground as the crashed aircraft – show no respect for the men who died at these places or indeed the surviving family members or other visitors. No doubt your analysis is correct; some people got fed up carrying the debris and dumped it. I wonder if it is from the C-47 crash site in Ashton Clough? I agree, these places are now like memorials and should be left alone. It is unlawful to remove debris as well as unethical but clearly that won’t stop the minority.

  2. andrew says:

    Well I am surprised that all this metal is left lying around for people to injure themselves on, not sensible people but there are people who will mess around with the wreckage as can be seen , it would be more respectful to the dead to clean up the site and put a proper memorial there instead of twisted metal…

  3. clive says:

    i’m sure there are laws against the taking of artefacts from these sites, but who’s going to police them ?

    • Ian D B says:

      That’s the problem Clive. The only way crash site remains will be visible to at least some people in future is if people stop removing them now. But it will all disappear in time.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*