Contact

cropped-cropped-tyerrr

© 2016 aircrashsites.co.uk 

43 comments on “Contact
  1. Hi Ian, great site – will be in touch soon

  2. Hazel Shelton says:

    Hi Ian!
    Congratulations on opening this new site, a brilliant platform for your wonderful photos and stories of the air crashes.
    Will keep in touch through this site, take care!
    Hazel

  3. Andy says:

    Ian

    I mentioned a book i’ve come across. It’s called Dark Peak Hikes Off the Beaten Track and it’s by Doug Brown (hang on Ian DB.. that’s not you is it?) ISBN 978-1-85058-883-2.It is full of Air crash sites (off the beaten track) Great read, i will be checking a few out over the coming weeks.
    Talk care Andy

    • Ian D B says:

      Hi Andy, thanks for your visit – and for the heads-up about the book. Lol, no not by me! But I have just been on Amazon and ordered a copy.

      By the way, I was struggling to indentify that aircraft you photographed recently over Stalybridge, do you know what it was?

      Cheers!

      Ian

  4. lesley says:

    Ian! This is such a great website! You have put such hard work into it. Feel very proud!
    Lovely to see all your work under this one roof

    Lesley xx

  5. Dave says:

    Hi Ian,

    Just been doing my usual Sunday morning browse of news stories on the net whilst enjoying my usual morning coffee and came across this link – http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-24159975 – which you might find interesting if you haven`t seen it yet ? Looks a wee bit more dangerous than your average wreck recovery but no doubt worth it in the end !

    Hope you are well and that you and Paul are still continuing your wreck hunting activities – keep up the good work,

    Cheers

    Dave.

    PS: Have you finished reading all those damn books yet !

    • Ian D B says:

      Hi Dave,
      Thanks for the link, very interesting. It is pathetic that some locals don’t want to remember the dead because they were the enemy (though bearing in mind this is a news report, “not everyone is happy to see this history brought to light” might mean one person… or none at all!).

      Yeah a terrific story that, thanks.

      I have been making good use of the books alright, they are a really valuable resource when it comes ot looking for unusual photos of aircraft or details not recorded elsewhere. Can’t beat out of print books for coming up with a gem just when you need it!

      All’s well but not been out much lately but I should be back in the hills next weekend…

      Thanks for getting in touch,

      Ian

  6. Dave says:

    Hi Ian,

    Glad that you`ve been able to make use of the books – it`s great that they are appreciated and that they are being used again rather then stored somewhere gathering dust !

    I`ve been uploading to Flickr quite a lot recently as I`ve given up on Ipernity because there is very little activity there and a lot of my contacts stuck with Flickr in the end 🙂 We recently went on holiday to East Anglia and managed to get over to Duxford for a day – the highlight was seeing a B24 “in the flesh” – although I`ve loads of photos my dad took of them in Burma I`ve never seen one before ! Other than that it`s the usual car shows and sometimes sadly my continuing task of capturing closed pubs before they are lost for good.

    Anyway I look forward to more of your wreck hunting pics – once the weather closes in and you & Paul decide to give up for winter maybe we should get together for a pint !

    Cheers,

    Dave

    • Ian D B says:

      Hi Dave, yeah be great to meet up again! Paul has been working overseas a lot lately, reckon we should resume normal service soon. Been helluva busy at work lately.

      Duxford is always a treat. If ever you get chance, see the Flying Legends airshow at Duxford, it is world class. Duxford is also where I had that Tiger Moth flight…

      Will check oout your stream (and everyone elses!) soon. But yes, the books get used a lot!

      Ian

  7. rob finch says:

    Hi Ian,
    Hope you’re good?
    All the best,
    Rob
    PS.
    My Flickr stream tells me you are ‘deleted’ – is this right?

    • Ian D B says:

      Hi Rob, thanks for taking the time to visit and comment. I have deleted one flickr account – the new Ian DB one – because I never used it and noticed on a rare occasion when I logged on that people had e-mailed me at that account. Main reason for deleting it is to prevent e-mails going unanswered for weeks on end. All good though, busy at work but all good! Hope you are well? Will pay you a visit on flickr soon.
      Ian

  8. ang wickham says:

    Hi
    I’ve tried finding the POW article – with the link that provides locations of POW camps in the UK. I think it stemmed from the Italian POW / river post … Could you please provide me with a link? Ta much, Ang

  9. mick cooke says:

    hi Ian
    hope your well and had a great christmas ,all the best for the new year
    take care
    mick

  10. dale says:

    took some pictures of a liberator crash in glair loch , north west scotland if you wanna see them .

  11. Gary Brady says:

    Hi I am trying to find information on a possible RAF crash in Liverpool during World War 2, I am sure I have read about a plane crashing onto playing fields at Holly Lodge School West Derby Liverpool , and that it was a target tug possibly a Hawker Henley???? I have searched the net but to no avail…..did it really happen or have I dreamt it, any info or ideas on where to look would be appreciated.

    Thanks Gary

    • Ian D B says:

      Hi Gary, I will take a look in my books on the subject and get back to you. Am a bit tied up at the moment but hope to be in touch by the end of the week. Cheers,
      Ian

  12. Gary says:

    Hi Ian, I can’t believe it I have tried for a few years to find information, I contact you and discussing it with a friend in my local , A complete stranger interupted and said up it was a Hotspur Glider not a powered aircraft
    that crashed in the School Field in winter 1942……..this may help!!!!

    • Ian D B says:

      Hi Gary,

      The person interrupting you was correct. The good news is that the aircraft can be identified as Hotspur BT723 which crash landed at the school after the pilot got lost in low cloud on 23 October 1942. The bad news is I have no more on the incident. You could use the aircraft number as a basis for further research though, try the RAF Museum at Hendon. And although it will be censored, because you have the date you may be able to find reference to it in a local newspaper of the time; book a microfilm reader at the library nearest to West Derby and go through the local rags for a couple of weeks after 23 Oct 1942. There may even be a photo of it!

      Ian

  13. Gary says:

    Ian Thanks for all your help, It’s spooky that for such a long time no one had heard of it, and then after asking for your help the answer appears or some of the answer from an unexpected quarter. I will check out the local newspapers around that time

    Thanks again

    Gary

  14. Jogon says:

    Interesting stuff, thanks
    Over here in Leeds we get a bit West Yorkshire – centric.

    I like to visit Manchester and environs occasionally. Manchester seems a bit less up itself than Leeds

    • Ian D B says:

      Thanks Rick, good to see you. I don’t get on flickr much these days. I get into Leeds on occasion but don’t know the place well enough to recognise any character… I prefer Liverpool to Manchester as a place to visit but the docks and industrial and war remains of both these cities have appeal for me.

      Hope you are well and thanks for dropping by!

      Ian

  15. barbara white says:

    hi read your article on the bomb that fell on Hanson lane Halifax. my great great aunt Emmerline Jagger was injured by the bomb and died the following march . she is registered in he civilian death register

  16. helen says:

    hello again – just a quick one – I’ve added photos of a trip to East Kirkby to Flickr. I saw a Lancaster in the summer at Chiltern Open Air Museum (the British flying one). Was fantastic and the pilot flew over us 3 times – lower each time – got great photos. Anyway it got me thinking about the Lancaster I saw in Blackpool in the early ’70’s and I wondered if it was the same one – that one did fly then. I went in it – you could go in and have a look around (not fly!) but I really didn’t like it and my mum had to get me out! Put photos on facebook and a girl I was at school with said she also went in it in Blackpool. I found out it was at East Kirkby near Spilsby and ahe said she was born there because her dad was in the RAF. I was visiting friends in Skegness a couple of weeks ago so popped by to see it.
    Here’s the photos- just scroll down to see them (still don’t like Flickr!)
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/stickotopia/
    While I was there – there was a small exhibit about a crashed American plane – Lady Be Good and I suddenly realised I’d watched a film vaguely based on it – then (after I thought I was going mad – it wasn’t Flight of the Phoenix) – I found it on the net – was called Sole Survivor with William Shatner in it – ghost story really – that’s why I probably remembered it. Was a really good story but was a made for tv film I reckon – in the ’70’s too.
    Anyway – thought I’d say hello – it’s all fascinating stuff.
    Helen

    • Ian D B says:

      Hi Helen, great to hear from you and thanks for your visit and comment. I have taken a look at your photos of Just Jane and also Drag em oot at East Kirkby – some lovely photos there, good to see them. Also took a look at your photos taken at Chiltern, some smashing photos you got. I got to see the visiting Canadian Lanc when it was touring, saw it fly over the Rolls Royce factory at Barnoldswick and then later in the day at Holmfirth. It’s amazing to read of you being able to just go inside the Lanc – costs a small fortune to do that now at East Kirby and you have to book well in advance.

      I shall have to check out the movie with William Shatner. The only one I remember him in involving a ghost and an aircraft was a film called ‘Horror at 37,000 feet.’ It was a crappy effort, involved the passengers on an airliner having to defeat a druid ghost from an altar being flown to America… I’d laugh if I watched it now but aged 9 it scared the living daylights out of me!

      Ian

  17. Barry Lightfoot says:

    A Wellington Bomber crashed on Carn Bach, Llaniestyn, North Wales during World War II. Came down in very dense fog I was told, there’s nothing structural left but if you dig around you find all sorts of odds and ends. My brother and I dragged down the last half decent sized chunk of it in the 70’s (we were young and knew not what we were doing). On a side note it was my Grandfathers job during the war to collect crashed planes American, German and British and he had a sizeable collection of odds and ends he’d picked up but my nan threw out the lot.

    • Ian D B says:

      Cheers Barry, I shall have to look into that, I’ve loads of old books detailing crash sites in North Wales, one will have a record of it. Ian

  18. Dave L says:

    Hi Ian,

    Just been trawling the local papers for anything interesting and found this article which you might find of interest –

    http://www.burytimes.co.uk/news/13527615.Folk_band_to_play_concert_in_bomb_crater_made_by_Zeppelin_which_killed_13_in_Bolton/?ref=mr&lp=5

    Not sure if you`ve covered this before but looks like a dark day in Lancashire history from waay back 🙁

    We managed to get to Barton recently to see the Vulcan flypast and a couple of weeks ago went to Blackpool to see her again – only problem was traffic, it took up 4 hours ( bear in mind it`s about 38 miles fron home ) and we missed 1/2 the show including the Spitfire and Vulcan 🙁 The good news is we saw the Red Arrows again who were, as usual, superb – managed to get a few decent shots of them at least ! So it`s
    Southport for us next month to see XH558 for the last time – will probably go by train as from previous experience getting there/back by car will be a nightmare !

    Hope you are well and that you and Paul are still managing to get out and about on the hills :-))

    Cheers,

    Dave

    PS:- Arrows shot below :-

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/davel59/20246121610/in/datetaken-ff/

    • Ian D B says:

      Hi Dave, thanks for the link. There is a piece I did on the Zeppelin attack, it is on these pages somewhere.

      Sad to hear about you missing the Vulcan. Hope to catch it at Yorkshire air show next month though you saw it at Barton which is something. Excellent shot of the Red Arrows!

      Ian

  19. Dave L says:

    hello Ian this is Davids wife Kathy.sorry to have to tell you that David died of a heart attack on 22/8/15.only just found this email

  20. Gary says:

    Just like to ask if possible, weither the aircraft ID Plate was with the remains of 44-13521 P-51D Mustang ‘Sunny VII’ when you visited the aircraft. ? The reason I ask is because a restoration outfit in Norfolk claims to be rebuilding ‘Sunny VII’ to flying status. I wondered if they have the original data plate from the aircraft to get it through the CAA to get a ‘COA’ ticket.

    • Ian D B says:

      Hi Gary, I’m afraid anything like that will have long since been removed by souvenir hunters. There are only scant remains left but nothing like that. Is possible there may be stuff under the surface. I don’t know but doubt it will be there.
      Ian

  21. Robert Coverdill says:

    Hello,
    I am an American that is in search of information regarding the crash site of a B-24J that was piloted by my father, Edward Coverdill. It crashed on 2 FEB 1944 9 miles east of Barnstaple, near Charles. I have quite a bit of information regarding the crash, but am lacking the location. I would really like to visit this site to provide some closure. My father survived, but was severely injured. Here are the basics of what I know:

    The aircraft (B-24J, sn 2100409) was being ferried from the factory in the US to the UK. As such, the aircraft had no bombs on board.
    It carried 9 crew, 6 of which were “replacement” crew (gunners, radio operators, co-pilot), and the remaining 3 were assigned together to ferry aircraft, and were slated to return to the US to deliver another airplane. This included my father, Edward Coverdill, and his navigator, Robert Dimond (who perished). I am unsure of his permanent third crew member.
    Only 3 survived.
    It departed from Marrakech, Morocco, in Africa, at around midnight (local time in UK), with its destination being an airfield in the UK. I am not certain where it was destined.
    It crashed after some 13.5 hours of flying, likely having spent its fuel supply.
    The weather in southwest UK on 2 FEB 44 was virtually unflyable. Visibility was zero, and clouds extended to over 20,000 feet.
    I recall my father saying that after the crash, there was no emergency assistance until many hours afterwards. The crash occurred at 13:27 Greenwich Mean Time, which I think is roughly the same as local time in Devon. So that means the crew laid in the wreckage during the night, which was most certainly bone chilling.
    I have recently learned that the aircraft was lost over the water southwest of England. It was heard calling “Mayday” on the radio in areas of Torquay and then Exeter between 1200 and 1330Z. It ultimately crash landed “9 miles east of Barnstaple, North Devonshire.”

    I have 5 high quality original photos of the crash site that I can upload. I would most certainly be interested in being able to correspond with anyone in the area who might have information regarding the Charles crash site, as this sounds like the most likely match with what I recall my father stating. I found it’s location on Google Maps, and it almost exactly is 9 miles east of Barnstaple. Please feel free to pass along my email, name, etc. I am seriously contemplating a visit to the Devonshire area within the next 6 months. It would indeed be gratifying to visit the site of the crash, and it would provide immense closure to me.

    • Ian D B says:

      Hi Robert, thanks for your query. Most of the info I have relates to air crashes in the north of England and Wales but I will take a look at the books I have and get back to you soon. If I cannot find any detail there may be a message board where you might get some help, I will advise after I’ve taken a look around.
      Ian

  22. Simon says:

    Dornier Do17 F1+AT 15 Sep 1940 – Rotherfield, East Sussex
    I finally managed to track this one down after nearly 18 months of searching. Various publications mention various places all nearby – Bicycle Arms, Red Lane Farm, Argos Hill, Paynes Farm. Author Simon Parry sent me some contemporary combat, occurrence, constabulary and 49 Maint reports then even more priceless I met with a farmer who was on the scene and took me there to show me the spot. He is an absolute goldmine of info, taking me to one of the searchlight fields, the house where tiles blew off from a V1, the road where he picked up .303 shell cases and lots more.

  23. Audrey Bowness says:

    I saw a plane crash on holly lodge playing fields when I was a child trying to find date and any photos thank you

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*